Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar

About

The Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar (NLUS) program, sponsored by DePaul University, Loyola University Chicago, Roosevelt University, and the University of Illinois at Chicago, offers Chicago-area undergraduates a semester-long humanities seminar each year from January to May. The seminar carries the credit of two courses and involves reading assignments, research in the Newberry’s core collections, and a major research paper.

Seminars are team-taught and topics vary from year to year. Each class is limited to twenty participants, and they are given reserved study space and special reader privileges. Students are encouraged to work closely with Newberry librarians, curators, and research staff. Working on-site at an independent research library gives students the chance to learn about different kinds of careers in the humanities. Many NLUS alumni have gone on to pursue work in libraries, museums, academia and other research-intensive fields.

The Spring 2021 NLUS course will be “Chicago, City of Industry, Art & Labor, 1890-1960,” taught by Elizabeth Tandy Shermer and Melissa Bradshaw of Loyola University.

This seminar has such dedicated and passionate professors and students who are all so invested in the subject. This was the best part of my undergraduate experience so far!

Nina Molin ’21, Loyola University Chicago

Take this course if you want to conduct research and hone your researching skills in a professional setting and be treated like you are a professional.

Amber Barkes ’19, Roosevelt University

Previous NLUS Courses

  • 2020: “Shakespeare’s Afterlives: Literature, Philosophy, Politics, and the Visual Arts, 1623-2020”
  • 2019: “Modern Literature and Art in Chicago, 1900-1960,” Melissa Bradshaw (English, Loyola), Mark Pohlad (History of Art and Architecture, DePaul)
  • 2018: “Censorship and Freedom of Expression in an Era of Religious Change: Western Europe, 1450-1789,” Valentina Tikoff (History, Depaul) and Glen Carman (Spanish, DePaul)
  • 2017: “Exchange Before Orientalism: Asia and Europe, 1500-1800,” Laura Hostetler (History, UIC) and Ellen McClure (French, UIC)
  • 2016: “Breaking the Chains: Revolt, Rebellion, and Resistance in the World of Atlantic Slavery,” John Donoghue (History, Loyola) and Jeffrey Glover (Literature, Loyola)
  • 2015: “Mexico and Peru through Word and Image, 1492-1820,” Priscilla Archibald (Literature and Languages, Roosevelt) and Delia Cosentino (Art History, DePaul)
  • 2014: “Representing the American Civil War: Art, History, and Literature, 1820-1890,” Marcy Dinius (English, DePaul) and Margaret Story (History, DePaul)
  • 2013: “Exchange before Orientalism: Encounters between Asia and Europe, 1500-1800,” Ellen McClure (French, UIC) and Laura Hostetler (History, UIC)
  • 2012: “Texts and Technologies: From Manuscripts to Early Printed Books and Beyond,” Edward Wheatley (English, Loyola) and David Halsted (History, UIC)
  • 2011: “Constructing the Queen: Elizabeth I in Political Pamphlets, Poetry, Personal Correspondence, Portraiture, Plays, Pulp Fiction, and Motion Pictures,” Regina Buccola (English, Roosevelt) and Celeste Chamberland (History, Roosevelt)
  • 2010: “Islands: Missionaries, Migration, Labor in the Atlantic World and on the Pacific Rim,” Lori Pierce (American Studies, DePaul University) and Erik Gellman, (History, Roosevelt University)
  • 2009: “New Nation/New Culture: the United States in the Age of the Early Republic, 1770-1850,” Diane Dillon (Art History, Newberry) and Lawrence Howe (English, Roosevelt)
  • 2008: “Islam and the West: European and American Views of the Muslim World, 1450-1900,” Kim Searcy (History, Loyola) and Katrin Schultheiss (History, University of Illinois at Chicago)
  • 2007: “Constructing the Queen: Elizabeth I in Political Pamphlets, Poetry, Personal Correspondence, Portraiture, Plays, Pulp Fiction, and Motion Pictures,” Regina Buccola (English, Roosevelt) and Celeste Chamberland (History, Roosevelt)
  • 2006: “Exchange before Orientalism: Encounters between Asia and Europe, 1500-1800,” Ellen McClure (French, UIC) and Laura Hostetler (History, UIC)
  • 2005: “Sites of Democracy and Difference: U.S. Popular Culture and Entertainment, 1830-1930,” Ann Brigham (English and Women’s and Gender Studies, Roosevelt) and Lewis Erenberg (History, Loyola)
  • 2004: “New Nation/New Culture: American Culture in the Early Republic, 1770-1850,” Douglas Bradburn (History, Roosevelt) and Lawrence Howe (English, Roosevelt)
  • 2003: “Constructing the Queen: Elizabeth I in Political Pamphlets, Poetry, Personal Correspondence, Portraiture, Plays, Pulp Fiction, and Motion Pictures,” Regina Buccola (English, Roosevelt) and Robert Bucholz (History, Loyola)
  • 2002: “The Pan-Hispanic World, 1492-1825,” Glen Carman (Spanish, DePaul) and Valentina Tikoff (History, DePaul)
  • 2001: “Experiencing the Civil War,” Robin Grey (English, UIC) and Margaret Storey (History, DePaul)
  • 2000: “London Town and Bath Spa: Two Concepts of Eighteenth-Century Urbanity,” Robert Bucholz (History, Loyola) and Caryn Chaden (English, DePaul)
  • 1999: “Mapping Identities: Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Configurations in Modernist Representations,” Pamela Caughie (English, Loyola) and Ayana Karanja (Black World Studies, Loyola)
  • 1998: “New Nation/New Culture: American Culture in the Age of the Early Republic,” John Burton (History, DePaul) and Lawrence Howe (English, Roosevelt)
  • 1997: “Competing Landscapes in the Struggle for an American National Identity,” Robin Grey (English, UIC) and David Sokol (Art History, UIC)